Adriana Villavicencio

picture of Adriana  Villavicencio

Assistant Professor
School of Education


B.A., Columbia University, 2000, English
M.A., Columbia University, 2002, English Education
Ph.D., New York University, 2010, Educational Leadership and Policy

Phone: (949) 824-8542
Email: adriana.v@uci.edu

University of California, Irvine
2066 Education
Mail Code: 5500
Irvine, CA 92697
Research Interests
K-12 policy and practice, educational equity for minoritized communities, research-practice partnerships
Research Abstract
Dr. Villavicencio is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Irvine. Her research is focused on K-12 educational policy and school practice that deepens or disrupts inequities for minoritized communities of students and families. For nearly a decade, she conducted research at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at NYU—a Research-Practice Partnership with the NYC Department of Education (DOE). As Deputy Director of the Research Alliance, she helped shape the organization’s research agenda, obtained over $9 million in external grants, developed relationships with external partners, and led many of the organization’s large-scale mixed-method research projects focused on the NYC school system.

Dr. Villavicencio’s work includes mixed-method studies on turnaround middle schools, small high schools in NYC, schools serving newly arrived immigrant English Learners, and a racial justice program embedded in culturally diverse elementary schools. She also led a longitudinal study of the Expanded Success Initiative, a precursor to My Brother’s Keeper and one of the country’s largest initiatives targeting Black and Latino male students. Her forthcoming book, Am I My Brother’s Keeper: Educational Opportunities and Outcomes for Black and Brown Boys, published by Harvard Education Press, examines how districts and schools can embed racial equity work into the very fabric of how they serve students. The book also provides a set of concrete approaches and recommendations, so that other districts and schools can take up similar efforts with even more robust results.

Dr. Villavicencio has conducted research at MDRC, the RAND Corporation, and Westat. She is a recipient of the Founders Fellowship from New York University and a Graduate Student Fellowship from MDRC. Dr. Villavicencio served on the advisory board for the Young Women’s Initiative; as a member New York State’s Board of Regents Research Workgroup on Integration, Diversity and Equity; and as President of the Board of Directors for the Latino Alumni Association of Columbia University. She is the author of numerous publications on race and equity in schools and regularly presents her research at national conferences and through a variety of both English and Spanish television and online media.

Prior to becoming a researcher, she taught high school English in Oakland, California and Brooklyn, New York. She also worked on the development of a new school in Bangalore, India. Dr. Villavicencio earned her Ph.D. in education leadership and policy from the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. She also holds an M.A. in English Education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a B.A. in English from Columbia University.
Publications
Villavicencio, A., Klevan, S., & Kemple, James. (2018). The Expanded Success Initiative: Challenges and Progress in the Pursuit of College and Career Readiness for Black and Latino Young Men. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Fancsali, C., Martin, W., Mark, J., & Cole, R. (2018). Computer Science in New York City; An Early Look at Teacher Training Opportunities and the Landscape of CS Implementation in Schools. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A. & Tung, R. (Eds.) (2018) The Boys Aren’t Broken, The Systems Are Changing the Narrative about Young Men of Color. Voices in Urban Education, 48. Providence: Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University.

Tung, R. & Villavicencio, A. (2018) Disrupting Structural Racism: Counter-Narratives of Pride, Growth, and Transformation. Voices in Urban Education 48: 3-6. Providence: Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University.

Villavicencio, A., Goldenberg, S., & Klevan, S. (2018). Understanding and Dismantling Barriers to College and Career Success for Black and Latino Young Men. In B. Bowser (Ed.) Racial Inequality in New York City: Looking Backward and Forward. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Villavicencio, A. (2017). Turning Around from Within: Using Internal Capacity to Improve Low-Performing Schools. In C. Meyers & M. Darwin (Eds.) Enduring Myths that Inhibit School Turnaround. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Klevan, S., & Villavicencio, A. (2017). Evaluating an Initiative for Black and Latino Male High School Students: A Mixed-Method Study. SAGE Research Methods Cases.

Byrne-Jimenez, M., Villavicencio, A., Rivera-McCutchen, R., & Torres, C. (2015). “Of and With: Stories of Belonging and Forging Multiple Latino/a Identities in Four Voices.” In F. Hernandez (ED.), Abriendo Puertas, Cerrando Heridas (Opening Doors, Closing Wounds), 63-73. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Kirkland, D., Villavicencio, A., & Fergus, E. (2016). How can we improve school climate and discipline practices? Schools can do it, but not alone. New York: Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University.

Klevan, S., & Villavicencio, A. (2016). Strategies for Improving School Culture: Educator Reflections on Transforming the High School Experience for Black and Latino Young Men. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Schwab, B., & Layafette, C. (2016). Bridging The Gap: How the NYC DOE is Working to Bring Ed-Tech and Classrooms Together. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A. & Laing, T. (2016). Guides for Educators: Inside the ESI Schools’ Efforts to Boost College Readiness for Black and Latino Young Men. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Siman, N., Lafayette, C., & Kang, D. (2016). Connecting Teachers and Ed-Tech Developers: Lessons from NYC's "Gap App" Program. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Klevan, S., & Kang, D. (2015). Changing How High Schools Serve Black and Latino Young Men: A Report on NYC’s Expanded Success Initiative. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A. (2015). Creating and Maintaining Student Diversity in Charter Schools: Strategies and Challenges for School Leaders. International Journal of Leadership in Education. 19(3), 300-326.

Villavicencio, A. & Marinell, W. (2014). Understanding Success: The Strategies of 25 Effective Small Schools in NYC. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Klevan, S., & Wulach, S. (2014). Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men: Findings from the Early Implementation of the Expanded Success Initiative. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Klevan, S., Villavicencio, A., & Wulach, S. (2013). Preparing Black and Latino Males for College and Careers: A Description of the Schools and Strategies in NYC’s Expanded Success Initiative. New York, NY: Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A., Bhattacharya, D., & Guidry, B. (2013). Moving the Needle: Exploring Key Levers to Boost College Readiness among Black and Latino Males in NYC. New York NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A. & Grayman, J. (2012). Learning from “Turnaround” Middle Schools: Strategies for Success. New York, NY: The Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Villavicencio, A. (2013). “It’s Our Best Choice Right Now:” Examining the Choice Options of Charter School Parents. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 21(73).

Scott, J. & Villavicencio, A. (2009). School Context and Charter School Achievement: A Framework for Understanding the Performance “Black Box.” Peabody Journal of Education, 84(2), 227-243

Villavicencio, A. (2009). Culturally Responsive Education: Reviews. Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World: A Review Journal, 1(2), 62-63, 63-64, 72-73.
Grants
Providing Anti-Racist Training for Educators: An Evaluation of Border Crossers’ Core Programming. W.K. Kellogg Foundation. $110K. July 2017-December 2019.
Examining the Causes, Consequences, and Solutions to Educational Inequalities in NYC: Diversity Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, $85K. September 2017-August 2019.
Maker Partnership: A Research Practice Partnership to Integrate Computer Science and Computational Thinking into Science Instruction. National Science Foundation, $1.25M, January 2018-December 2020.
Improving the Experiences and Outcomes of Immigrant Youth: An Examination of the International Network for Public Schools. William T. Grant Foundation, Co-PI, $588K, June 2017-December 2020.
Studying Systemic Efforts to Improve Educational Outcomes for Black and Latino Males. AERA Education Research Conference Award. $35K, September 2017.
Computer Science is Fundamental: Evaluating the Reach, Quality, and Impact of CS4ll. The Fund for Public Schools, PI, $5M, September 2016-June 2025.
Evaluating the Implementation and Impact of the Expanded Success Initiative. Open Society Foundation, PI, $2M, September 2012-June 2016.
Data Use in Action. Spencer Foundation, $350K, 2014-2015.
A Lever for More Equitable Access to Schools? Evidence from San Francisco. William T. Grant Foundation, Co-PI, $600K, July 2020-June 2023.
Reimagining Educational Equity and Opportunity (REEO) during the COVID-19 Pandemic. University of California, Irvine, Office of Inclusive Excellence, Co-PI, $25K, June 2020-May 2021.
Last updated
10/26/2020