Andrew R. Highsmith

Assistant Professor, History
School of Humanities

Faculty Affiliate, Center in Law, Society and Culture

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2009, History

Phone: History Department: (949) 824-6521
Email: highsmia@uci.edu

University of California, Irvine
Department of History
200 Murray Krieger Hall
Mail Code: 3275
Irvine, CA 92697

picture of Andrew R. Highsmith

Research
Interests
20th Century U.S., Urban/Metropolitan, Public Health, Race and Class, Public Policy
   
Academic
Distinctions
Winner, Best Dissertation Award, Urban History Association, 2009-2010.

Winner, John Reps Prize, Best Doctoral Dissertation in American City and Regional Planning History, Society for American City and Regional Planning History, 2009-2010.

Finalist, Exemplary Dissertation Award, Spencer Foundation, 2010.

Winner, Walter Rodney Essay Contest, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan, 2002.

Inductee, Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society, 1999.
   
Research
Abstract
Andrew R. Highsmith is a specialist in modern U.S. history with particular interests in metropolitan development, public policy, racial and economic inequalities, and public health.

His first book, Demolition Means Progress: Flint, Michigan, and the Fate of the American Metropolis, explores the spatial and structural barriers to racial equality and economic opportunity in metropolitan Flint from the early twentieth century to the present. An in-depth case study of the political economy of racial and economic inequality in modern America, Demolition explains how the perennial quest for urban renewal—even more than white flight, corporate abandonment, and other forces—contributed to mass suburbanization, racial and economic division, deindustrialization, and political fragmentation.

Professor Highsmith's current book project, Toxic Metropolis: Cities, Suburbs, and the Battle over Public Health in Modern America, is a wide-ranging, national and transnational study focusing on how the spatial reorganization of urban centers and the growth of mass consumption during the twentieth century affected both public health outcomes and the political economy of wellness in the United States. At its core, the project seeks to situate social and political struggles over health and wellness at the center of the modern American experience.
   
Publications Books:

Toxic Metropolis: Cities, Suburbs, and the Battle over Public Health in Modern America (in progress).

Demolition Means Progress: Flint, Michigan, and the Fate of the American Metropolis (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Historical Studies of Urban America, July 6, 2015).

Journal Articles:

“Nuisance Clustering: Race, Industry, and the Infrapolitics of Zoning in Modern America,” (article in progress for the Journal of Urban Affairs, submission in Winter 2016).

“The Strange Career of De Facto Segregation: Race and Region in the Scholarly Imagination,” (article in progress for Urban History, submission in Fall 2015), coauthored with Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University.

“Building the Segregated Metropolis: Schools, Housing, and the Divisive History of Neighborhood Unit Planning,” (article in progress for the Journal of Planning History, submission in Fall 2015), coauthored with Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University.

“Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow,” American Journal of Education 121 (August 2015): 563-595, coauthored with Ansley T. Erickson, Teachers College, Columbia University.

“Beyond Corporate Abandonment: General Motors and the Politics of Metropolitan Capitalism in Flint, Michigan,” Journal of Urban History 40, no. 1 (January 2014): 31-47.

“Prelude to the Subprime Crash: Beecher, Michigan, and the Origins of the Suburban Crisis,” Journal of Policy History 24, no. 4 (October 2012): 572-611.

“Demolition Means Progress: Urban Renewal, Local Politics, and State-Sanctioned Ghetto Formation in Flint, Michigan,” Journal of Urban History 35, no. 3 (March 2009): 348-368.

Book Chapters:

“The Historiography of 20th-Century Metropolitan America,” in The Routledge History of the 20th Century United States, ed. Darren Dochuk and Jerald Podair (London: Routledge, 2016) (in progress).

Essays:

“Decline and Renewal in North American Cities,” Journal of Urban History 37, no. 4 (July 2011): 619-626.

“Jim Crow in the Vehicle City: The Strange Career of Community Education in Flint,” Uncommon Sense, May 2007.

Book Reviews:

“Review of S. Paul O’Hara, Gary, the Most American of All American Cities,” Technology and Culture 53 (July 2012): 710-712.

“Review of Patrick D. Jones, The Selma of the North: Civil Rights Insurgency in Milwaukee,” Law and History Review 28, no. 2 (May 2010): 560-562.

“Review of Kevin M. Kruse, White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism,” H-Pol, H-Net Reviews, May 2006, http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.cgi?path=283951160842622.
   
Grants Grants and Fellowships:
   
National Academy of Education / Spencer Foundation, Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2012-2013; Fellowship for Recent Doctoral Recipients, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation / American Council of Learned Societies, 2009-2010; Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation / American Council of Learned Societies, 2008-2009; Dissertation Fellowship, Spencer Foundation, 2007-2008; Melvin and Janey Lack Graduate Research Fellowship, Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies, University of Michigan, 2006-2007; Michigan Graduate Student Fellowship, Institute for the Humanities, University of Michigan, 2006-2007; Predoctoral Fellowship, Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, 2006-2007 (declined); Doctoral Research Award, Nonprofit and Public Management Center, University of Michigan, 2005; Humanities Research Candidacy Fellowship, Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, 2005; J. Vann Memorial Fellowship, Department of History, University of Michigan, 2005; Research Grant, Department of History, University of Michigan, 2004; Research Fellowship, South Carolina Bar Foundation, Columbia, SC, 2003-2004; Dean’s Research Grant, Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, 2002; Research Grant, Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, 2002; Regents’ Fellowship, Department of History, University of Michigan, 2001-2002.
   
Other Experience Assistant Professor, Public Administration
University of Texas at San Antonio 2010—2015

Faculty Affiliate, History
University of Texas at San Antonio 2010—2015

Faculty Affiliate, Urban and Regional Planning
University of Texas at San Antonio 2010—2015

   
Link to this profile http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=6152
   
Last updated 10/13/2017